Glee Celebrates Gender Rejection

April 27, 2012 - 5:33 AM

It was a very special disco-themed episode of "Glee" on Fox the other night. A new character named Wade from a different high school shared that he was born in the wrong body. He was black, but he said he felt he was born white and decided to go out on stage at Regionals painted over as a white man. Everyone adored and applauded him as he sang "Boogie Shoes" looking just like the lead singer of KC and the Sunshine Band.

If you actually watch "Glee" or just know Hollywood liberals, you know I'm kidding. Of course, he wasn't a white kid trapped in a black body. Wade was an unfortunate boy "trapped" in a male body. It was "Transgender Is Cool" night. Everyone must adore and applaud. A new wall is down.

Of course, had Wade wanted to reject his blackness, Hollywood would suggest there's something wrong with this boy. Why does he hate his own nature? What's wrong with being black? And how does a boy know he's not black? But the sexual libertines are different for some reason. They don't think it's wrong to reject your gender. In fact, it's a wonderful delusion to think you're something else. Society just needs the enlightenment and the "courage" to applaud it.

Why do parents allow their children to watch this garbage? On "Glee," Wade shows up declaring that he only had the confidence to come to school because "I pretended I was a different person, a person I dreamed of being — the real me." The "real me" is named — I'm not making this up — "Unique." Kurt, the effeminate homosexual teen, replies, "Unique sounds like a really great person. I hope one day you can build up enough courage to be him." Wade rebutted: "Actually, Unique's a her ... because that's what I feel like I am, inside." Dude. Or is it "Dudess"?

Wade's told that "this is Ohio" and it's not going to be accepted if he sings "Boogie Shoes" dressed up in a black dress and high heels. But "Unique" shows up to perform and is adored by the crowd. It's a true Hollywood ending.

The Huffington Post recently published an article titled "Raising a Transgender Child: A Star is Born." A mother named Julie Ross reported her 9-year-old son George declared, "he is a girl."

Nine years old. The moment of "truth" came when the Boston Globe published an article on its front page about identical twin boys, "one of whom had identified as transgender and was now living fully as a girl." Her son saw it and "It was at that moment that Jessie was born, moved in and has since made herself comfortable in my house." Shortly thereafter, "Jessie" got pierced ears and announced "herself" at school by showing up at Pajama Day in pink polka-dot pajamas.

The Globe story was headlined "Led by the child who simply knew. The twin boys were identical in every way but one. Wyatt was a girl to the core, and now lives as one, with the help of a brave, loving family and a path-breaking doctor's care."

The Globe promoted the "Children's Hospital Gender Management Services Clinic," which employs hormone therapies to halt puberty in "transgender children, blocking the development of secondary sexual characteristics — a beard, say, or breasts — that can make the eventual transition to the other gender more difficult, painful, and costly." The "girl" twin, Wyatt, now 14 and calling himself "Nicole," said the next step is mutilation — "to undergo surgery to get a physical female body that matches up to my image of myself."

It's so Orwellian that libertines promote the notion of finding out "who you really are" by rejecting exactly "who you really are."

At the Huffington Post, Ross reported that her son has received "total acceptance" in his imagined gender and she is "grateful that Jessie's social transition, thus far, has been as seamless as we ever could have hoped for. She has that sparkle in her eye and a new confidence which is the envy of many an adult."

Bill O'Reilly dared to strike a blow for traditionalism — and simple rational thought — on Fox News, not buying this "The Emperor Has Girl Clothes" attitude that's demanded of everyone. He said "Glee" could cause imitators: "They might go out and experiment with this stuff." For this obvious point, he was roundly booed.

Judge Jeannine Pirro replied incredulously to O'Reilly, "You're not saying it's contagious." It's not a medical metaphor. It's the usual Hollywood metaphor. They demand no one show someone glamorously smoking a cigarette because it promotes an unhealthy lifestyle. But it's truly a progressive moment of "truth" to show someone universally applauded for glamorously rejecting his or her own gender.

What's left out, with a fear of a viewpoint becoming "contagious"? Anyone who disagrees.