Team Leader: 'We Know From Radio Interceptions' Bergdahl Was Trying to Get 'In Touch with the Taliban'

June 4, 2014 - 1:04 PM

After Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl walked off his base in Afghanistan, his team leader says that IEDs started going off "directly under trucks" and the terrorists started getting "perfect hits every time. Their ambushes were very calculated, very methodical, like they knew what we were going to do."

"The fact is that we knew - from radio interceptions - that [Bergdahl,] before he got in touch with the Taliban, was looking for someone who spoke English so he could talk to the Taliban," Former Army Sgt. Evan Buetow told CNN's Jake Tapper.

"For the next couple of months, all the [terrorist] attacks were far more directed. Before he left, we'd have IEDs go off, virtually every day but they'd go off, but they were going off in front of the truck ...on the side of the road. Following his disappearance, IEDs started going off directly under the trucks," Former Army Sgt. Evan Buetow told CNN's Jake Tapper. "They were getting perfect hits every time. Their ambushes were very calculated, very methodical, like they knew what we were going to do."

"Obviously in the wake of him leaving, we had almost every asset in the area searching for him," Sgt. Buetow said. In fact, the Army spent 60 days looking for Bergdahl.

"There's equipment that can listen in to radio communications, cell phone communications between people, and there were teams monitoring that chatter," Buetow said. "I was standing right next to the radio when they heard that there's an American in a village... it's a village that has a very, very large presence of Taliban, and the American... 'is looking for someone who speaks English so he can talk to the Taliban.' And I heard it straight from the interpreter's lips as he heard it over the radio."

"At that point, it's like 'this is going out of control a little bit.' There's a lot more to this story than just a story just a soldier walking away," Sgt. Buetow said.