Bush Says His Tax Plan Helps More People than Gore's Does

July 7, 2008 - 7:26 PM

(CNSNews.com) - "I don't think the government should pick and choose winners," Republican George W. Bush said Monday, as he explained why his tax-cut plan is superior to - and would benefit more Americans - than Al Gore's tax plan.

Gore favors "targeted" tax cuts - specific tax breaks for specific people, such as those with children in daycare; those who are paying for college or caring for a sick relative, and so on. The Gore campaign Website lists more than two dozen ways Gore would reward or encourage certain behavior - within limits -- through the U.S. tax code.

But in Arkansas Monday, Bush said Gore's plan has so much "fine print," it excludes half of all taxpayers.

Bush explained, "The tax code is too complicated as it is. My opponent's plan makes it more complicated with a lot of fine print. You get tax relief if you behave a certain way or only if you meet certain small categories. It's so targeted, it misses the target," Bush said.

By contrast, Bush said his plan benefits everyone, beginning at birth with a $1,000-per-child tax credit for all. Gore, on the other hand, wants to limit any new tax breaks to parents of kids under age one who get childcare.

"My plan gives people options, not orders," said Bush. "I don't think government should pick and choose winners."

Bush says under his plan, the money parents save from the $1,000-per-child tax credit can be put into an education savings account every year. When a child enters college, the parents will have an estimated $25,000 per child to pay for college tuition and other expenses.

Bush plans to travel to nine states in the next week, covering more than 6,000 miles to push his "Blueprint for the Middle Class."

He's concentrating on what his campaign calls "the stages of life" - a tax-cut from birth on Monday, education (childhood) on Tuesday, then the marriage penalty tax (middle age) and Social Security (senior citizens) later in the week.

See Earlier Story:
Bush Crisscrossing America, Touting Blueprint For The Middle Class (18 Sept. 2000)