CBS/NYT Poll: Romney Pulls Ahead of Obama--Among Women

May 15, 2012 - 9:28 AM
Ann Romney

Ann Romney, her son, and her husband, Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney. (AP Photo)

(CNSNews.com) - A CBS/New York Times poll on the presidential race released Monday showed that Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney has not only moved ahead of President Barack Obama 46 percent to 43 percent among all registered voters, but also that Romney has moved ahead of Obama among female registered voters.

In the CBS/New York Times poll released a month ago, Obama led Romney among women 49 percent to 43 percent. In the new poll, Romney leads Obama among women 46 percent to 44 percent.

Last month’s CBS/New York Times poll was conducted April 13-17. This month’s poll was conducted May 11-13. In the month between these two polls, Obama lost 5 points among women and Romney gained 3 points.

In the current poll, Romney also leads Obama among men, 45 percent to 42 percent.  A month ago, he led Obama among men, 49 percent to 43 percent. So, from April to May, Romney lost 4 points among men compared to Obama's loss of only 1 point among men.

Nonetheless, Obama’s decreasing strength among women voters and Romney’s increasing strength among women voters put Romney ahead in the overall poll.

Last month, among all registered voters, Romney and Obama were tied in the CBS/New York Times poll at 46 percent a piece.

Romney's current 46 percent to 43 percent lead over Obama in the overall poll is within the poll's 4-point margin of error.

The respondents to the poll were asked: "If the 2012 presidential election were being held today and the candidates were Barack Obama, the Democrat, and Mitt Romney, the Republican, would you vote for Barack Obama or Mitt Romney."

According to a sheet including the historical trends in the poll that was released by the New York Times, 27 percent of the respondents to this survey said they were Republicans, 35 percent said they were Democrats and 34 percent said they were Independents.  In last month's poll, 26 percent said they were Republicans, 34 percent said they were Democrats, and 33 percent said they were Independents.