Civil Rights Leader Says KKK and Tea Party Have To Be Used 'Interchangeably'

August 27, 2010 - 12:32 PM
Rev. Dr. Walter Fauntroy criticized Glenn Beck's "Restoring Honor" rally and said the Ku Klux Klan and the Tea Party have to be used "interchangeably."
(CNSNews.com) - Civil rights activist Rev. Dr. Walter Fauntroy criticized Glenn Beck’s “Restoring Honor” rally set for this weekend and said the Ku Klux Klan and the Tea Party have to be used “interchangeably.”

“In 2010, the ring wing conservatives of this country have declared war on that civil rights movement of the 60s that brought together a coalition of conscience of people of every race creed and color for a march on jobs and freedom,” said Dr. Fauntroy, one of the chief organizers of Dr. Martin Luther King’s March on Washington in 1963.




He continued, “In 2012, from this press conference on, we’re going to organize, beginning with the original sponsors of the march on Washington, 63, a new coalition of conscience and we’re going to take on the barbarism of war, the decadence of racism and the scourge of poverty that the Ku Klux – I meant to say that the Tea Party – you all forgive me but you have to use them interchangeably.”

Glenn Beck’s “Restoring Honor” rally will take place this Saturday – the anniversary of Dr. Martin Luther King’s March on Washington in 1963.

"This is going to be an iconic event,"
Beck said. "This is going to be a moment that you'll never be able to paint people as haters, racists, none of it. This is a moment, quite honestly, that I think we reclaim the civil rights movement. It has been so distorted and so turned upside down. It is an abomination."

“They [right wing conservatives] have launched a counter offensive in 2010 based on a concept of the universal principle of exclusion – exclude everybody but those whom the founding fathers recognized when this nation was founded. They have said we want to go back to the founding fathers who were flawed because they said citizenship belongs only to white men who own property,” said Dr. Fauntroy, who served as the non-voting delegate of the District of Columbia from 1971-1991.

Dr. Fauntroy’s comments were made a press conference held on Thursday sponsored by the Religious Coalition for Reproductive Choice (RCRC) at the National Press Club where several African American leaders refuted what they call the “religious right attack on reproductive health in black communities.” Georgia Right to Life and the Radiance Foundation are some of the groups behind the billboards.

“So we did a little work to figure out who in the world is behind this insanity and of course it’s the same players, the same players who have traditionally tried to re-write history, have become historical distracters and to use this weekend when we remember that great march on Washington, 1963 as a pretense to give credence to their cause and their agenda is insulting,” said Rev. Timothy McDonald, the Pastor of First Iconium Baptist Church in Atlanta, GA.

He continued, “We are moving forward and not backwards and we cannot allow people like Beck and even Alveda to turn back the clock on where America has been headed.”