Family Group Protests TV 'Double Standards' on Homosexuality

July 7, 2008 - 7:02 PM

(CNSNews.com) - Conservative groups attempting to air television ads that offer counseling and help to men and women trying to abandon the homosexual lifestyle have run into what they say is "hypocrisy" on the part of some stations in Detroit for refusing to run the ads.

After local TV stations in the metropolitan Detroit area refused to accept the paid ads, several of the sponsoring organizations on Wednesday accused the stations of bowing to political pressure from homosexual rights groups.

"Local stations buckle under pressure from homosexual activists, hypocritically label such ads 'too controversial,' and willingly serve as the censorship arm of the homosexual propaganda campaign to hide the truth from the public and especially from homosexuals themselves, " said Gary Glenn, president of the American Family Association of Michigan.

Glenn told CNSNews.com that the only station to agree to run the ads was CBS affiliate WWJ-TV, but only in the 12:30-to-5 a.m. time slot.

"I thought (WWJ-TV's decision) was the least principled response of all, since they said 'we'll take your money as long as we make sure nobody sees the ads,'" said Glenn.

Station WWJ-TV could not be reached for comment.

Glenn said that by routinely broadcasting network programming that portrays the homosexual lifestyle in a positive light while refusing to accept paid ads offering to help people who wish to change their homosexual behavior, local stations are engaging in "censorship, double standards and hypocrisy."

According to the director of Reconciliation Ministries, a Michigan organization that works with men and women choosing to give up homosexual behavior, the ads feature couples who have rejected homosexuality and returned to, or begun, heterosexual marriages. The ads are not religious in nature, Carlton Quattlebaum told CNSNews.com, nor do they "vilify gays or paint them in unflattering pictures."

The theme of the ads, said Quattlebaum, was "It's not about hate, it's about hope," and that "change is possible" for those who want to give up homosexual behavior.