Gallup: Public Trusts GOP Leaders More Than Obama to Handle Deficit and Debt Limit

July 13, 2011 - 1:58 PM
President Barack Obama and House Speaker John Boehner

President Barack Obama speaks at a meeting with the congressional leadership at the White House, July 7, 2011. (AP photo)

(CNSNews.com) -  A plurality of Americans trust the Republican congressional leadership more than they trust President Barack Obama to handle the federal deficit and the debt ceiling, according to a new Gallup poll.

A majority of Americans are also more concerned that the government will raise the debt ceiling without plans for major spending cuts than they are that the government will precipitate a major economic crisis if it does not raise the debt limit.

Only 22 percent of Americans, according to Gallup, say they want their member of Congress to vote to raise the debt ceiling.

Between July 7-10, Gallup interviewed 1,016 adults for the poll.

Respondents were asked: “Who do you trust more to handle the issues concerning the federal budget deficit and the federal debt ceiling President Obama (or) the Republican leaders in Congress?”

Forty-six percent said they trusted the Republican leaders in Congress more, and 43 percent said they trusted President Obama more. Eleven percent said they had no opinion.

Respondents were also asked: “Which concerns you more: the government would not raise the debt ceiling and a major economic crisis would result (or) the government would raise the debt ceiling but without plans for major cuts in future spending?

Fifty-one percent said they were more concerned that the government would raise the debt ceiling without plans for major cuts in spending, while 32 percent said they were more concerned that that the government would not raise the debt ceiling and a major economic crisis would result.  Seventeen percent said they had no opinion.

When asked whether they would want their member in Congress to vote for or against raising the debt ceiling, 22 percent said they wanted their member in Congress to vote for raising the debt ceiling, 42 percent said they wanted their member to vote against it, and 35 percent said they did not know enough to say.

To see Gallup's full results and questions of this survey click here.