HUD Distributes $42 Million in Housing Counseling Funds to Liberal Activists

March 19, 2012 - 8:36 AM
HUD Secretary Detroit

U.S. Secretary for Housing & Urban Development, Shaun Donovan speaks at The White House LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender) Conference on Housing & Homelessness held at Wayne State University, on Friday, March 9, 2012, in Detroit. (AP Photo/The Detroit News, Max Ortiz) DETROIT FREE PRESS OUT-HUFFINGTON POST OUT-NO MAGS-NO SALES-NO ARCHIVE-MANDATORY CREDIT

(CNSNews.com) – The Housing and Urban Development Department (HUD) announced the release of $42 million in federal funding for mortgage counseling, including to groups such as La Raza, the Urban League, and the National Community Reinvestment Coalition.

“The HUD-approved counseling agencies this funding supports are crucial in helping struggling families on a one-to-one basis to manage their money, navigate the homebuying process, and secure their financial futures,” HUD Secretary Shaun Donovan said on a conference call Friday.

However, some of those “HUD-approved” groups include well-known liberal activist organizations.

One such group, the National Council of La Raza – a Spanish word that translates to “the Race” – received approximately $1.7 million from HUD. La Raza has long supported so-called comprehensive immigration reform that would effectively grant amnesty to the estimated 12 million illegal immigrants in America.

Another liberal group, the National Urban League, received approximately $1.05 million in HUD funds. The Urban League is one of America’s oldest civil rights organizations with a long history of social justice initiatives. Recently, it has denounced voter ID laws as “voter suppression by another name.”

A third liberal group is the National Community Reinvestment Corporation, which received approximately $2.5 million from HUD. NCRC is an activist group that seeks to combat perceived discrimination in housing and mortgage lending, and advocate for stronger enforcement of the federal Community Reinvestment Act – including expanding the CRA to securities firms, insurance companies, and mortgage companies – despite the fact that many claim the CRA played a major role in the 2008 mortgage crisis.

The remainder of the $42 million in federal funds was awarded to dozens of local affordable housing organizations, religious and private charities that cater to poor people who often lack the financial literacy needed to decide whether they can afford a mortgage or what type of loan is best for them.