Maher: Scalia’s Racial Entitlements Comment ‘More Racist Than Anything Paula Deen Ever Said’

July 1, 2013 - 12:03 PM

maher

HBO's Bill Maher (AP Photo)

(CNSNews.com) Comedian Bill Maher on Friday accused Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia of being “more racist” than Paula Deen.

“Can I read a quote from Justice Scalia about this? This is about the Voting Rights Act, and he said: ‘Whenever a society adopts racial entitlements, it is very difficult to get out of them through the normal political processes.’ Just the fact that he talks about black people voting as an entitlement, that is so much more racist than anything Paula Deen ever said,” Maher said on “Real Time with Bill Maher.”

Deen is a chef who specializes in Southern comfort food.

Twelve companies, including the Food Network, Target, Wal-Mart, Home Depot, and Smithfield, have cut ties with or distanced themselves from Deen after she admitted during a legal deposition in May that she had used the N-word in the past. Deen and her brother are being sued for racial and sexual discrimination by Lisa Jackson, who worked as manager of their restaurant in Savannah, Ga.

“I don’t know why I have become the champion of Paula Deen. I didn’t even know who this person was a year ago. I thought it was Tammy Faye Baker, if you showed me a picture of her,” Maher said.

“Donald Trump is a worst racist, but he doesn’t say the N-word. You know it’s like we have replaced having a conversation about race with, oh, okay, liberals feel good about themselves if they make the bad person go away. Who’s the bad person? The one we caught saying that one word?” Maher asked.

“Donald Trump is a worst racist, but he gets to keep his show, because he never said the word. Sarah Palin’s a worst racist. She said Obama was shucking and jiving his way to victory. Newt Gingrich said he was the food stamp president. This is real racist,” Maher added.

In oral arguments on the Voting Rights Act in Shelby v. Holder on Feb. 27, 2013, Scalia explained that the Supreme Court “doesn’t like to get involved in racial questions such as this one” and would rather it be left to Congress.

When the Voting Rights Act was initially enacted, there was double-digit opposition to it in the Senate, Scalia said. After repeated re-enactments, there was “not a single vote in the Senate against it” during the last enactment, he said, with the House doing “pretty much the same.”

“Now, I don't think that's attributable to the fact that it is so much clearer now that we need this. I don't think there is anything to be gained by any Senator to vote against continuation of this act,” Scalia said.

“I think it is attributable, very likely attributable, to a phenomenon that is called perpetuation of racial entitlement. It's been written about. Whenever a society adopts racial entitlements, it is very difficult to get out of them through the normal political processes,” Scalia added.

“I don't think there is anything to be gained by any Senator to vote against continuation of this act. And I am fairly confident it will be reenacted in perpetuity unless -- unless a court can say it does not comport with the Constitution. You have to show, when you are treating different States differently, that there's a good reason for it,” he said.