Maryland Pastor Slams NAACP for Its Support of ‘Same-Sex Marriage’

May 25, 2012 - 3:19 PM

mccoy

Pastor Derek McCoy, executive director of the Maryland Marriage Alliance.

(CNSNews.com) -- Pastor Derek McCoy, executive director of the Maryland Marriage Alliance, criticized the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) for its recent endorsement of same-sex marriage, calling it “unfortunate” and a clear signal that the association is “out of step” with its constituency.

The NAACP announced on May 19 that it supports “marriage” between homosexuals, 10  days after President Barack Obama announced that he supports “gay marriage.”

Concerning the NAACP announcemnt, Pastor McCoy told CNSNEws.com, “Clearly, they’re out of step with their constituency and their base.”

“They issued a release -- which is absolutely opposed to one another -- saying they support same-sex marriage,” said McCoy.  “At the same time, they support religious freedoms and things of that nature, which clearly you’re asking a large portion of their constituency and base to put aside their own deeply held religious beliefs.”

"It's unfortunate that the NAACP has taken this position," said McCoy.

On May 19, the NAACP passed a resolution which stated the association’s support for “marriage equality.” During a May 21 press conference, NAACP President and CEO Benjamin Todd Jealous said this is the first time the association has taken a stance on the issue as a whole.

“We feel it is important that everyone understand our commitment to equality under the Constitution and to marriage equality specifically,” said Jealous.

“We make this statement today because it is the legacy and responsibility of the NAACP to speak up on the civil rights issues of our times,” he said. “We are both proud of our history and challenged by it -- challenged to never allow threats to equality for all people under the law to go uncontested.”

McCoy made it clear that he respects the NAACP for all the work the association has done to advance civil rights for African Americans, but said he disagreed with its leadership on the issue of homosexual marriage.

“We respect the NAACP and their history and their fight on previous civil rights issues. However, on this one, they’ve got it wrong.” McCoy told CNSNews.com.

He attributed the NAACP’s announcement as a response to declining membership, and a “political calculation” that ultimately will backfire on the association.

When asked about President Obama’s recent support for “same-sex marriage,” McCoy called it an “absolute political maneuver” and a “financial move,” but also pointed out the Obama administration’s track record of promoting and endorsing homosexuality.

“His agenda has been clear in his administration in terms of taking down the Defense of Marriage Act, removing Don’t Ask Don’t Tell and any other political objective which I think demoralizes the family,” said McCoy.

He added that the family is the “core of society” and the definition of marriage as between a man and a woman supports the institution of family.

Approximately 39 percent of African Americans support “gay marriage” while 49 percent oppose such couplings, according to an April 2012 Pew Research poll.

According to its Web site, the Maryland Marriage alliance "is a grassroots, non-partisan, interfaith coalition dedicated to preserving the traditional definition of marriage in Maryland law." The group is supported by the Maryland Family Alliance, the Maryland Catholic Conference, and the National Organization for Marriage.