Cardinal Dolan on Gay Marriage Movement: 'We've Been Outmarketed'

December 2, 2013 - 3:19 PM

Archbishop Timothy Dolan

Roman Catholic Archbishop Timothy Dolan of New York (AP Photo/Mel Evans)

(CNSNews.com) – Cardinal Timothy Dolan, the Archbishop of New York, told NBC’s “Meet the Press” on Sunday that the Catholic Church is losing the argument on gay marriage, because it has been “outmarketed,” but he asserted that the debate is not over.

“I think maybe we've been outmarketed. Sometimes we've been caricatured as being anti-gay, and as much as we say, 'Wait a minute. We're pro-marriage. We're pro-traditional marriage. We're not anti-anybody,' I don't know,” Dolan said in response to a question about why the church is losing the argument over gay marriage.

“When you have forces like Hollywood, when you have forces like politicians, when you have forces like some opinion-molders that are behind it, it's a tough battle,” Dolan said.

Illinois became the 16th state to legalize gay marriage. In Hawaii, same-sex weddings began on Monday. The state allows couples to apply for a marriage license and get married the same day – a process that tourists who are in the state for a short period of time find useful.

“This week you had Illinois becoming the 16th state including DC to legalize same-sex marriage. Regardless of the church teachings, do you think this is evolving in a way that it's ultimately going to be legal everywhere? Or do you believe the opposite - that there will be a backlash and that the status quo will be maintained?” host David Gregory asked Dolan.

“I'd be a Pollyanna to say that there doesn't seem to be kind of a stampede to do this. I regret that. I wish that were not the case,” Dolan said.

Dolan offered hope that the tide could turn back on the gay marriage issue much like the abortion issue has gained steam among young people. When the Supreme Court legalized abortion in 1973, everyone thought opposition to abortion would go away, he said, but it “remains probably the most divisive issue in American politics.”

“And as you look at some of the changing attitudes, you say, 'Wow! We're beginning to affect the young with the pro-life message,'” Dolan added.

“So you don't think the gay marriage debate is over?” Gregory asked.

“I don't think it's over. No, I don't think it is,” Dolan responded.