Obama 'Surprised and Frustrated' and 'Not Pleased' by Massachusetts Senate Race

January 19, 2010 - 3:50 PM
President Barack Obama is "surprised and frustrated" and "not pleased" with the Senate race that will conclude in Massachusetts today, White House Spokesman Robert Gibbs told reporters during Tuesday's press briefing.
Robert Gibbs, White House press secretary

White House Press Secretary Robert Gibbs briefs reporters at the White House on Monday, Dec. 7, 2009. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)

(CNSNews.com) -- President Barack Obama is “surprised and frustrated” and “not pleased” with the Senate race that will conclude in Massachusetts today, White House Spokesman Robert Gibbs told reporters during Tuesday’s press briefing.
 
During the briefing, Gibbs fielded several questions about the special U.S. Senate election between Republican state Sen. Scott Brown and Democratic Attorney General Martha Coakly.  Recent polls show the Republican Brown leading in the race to fill the seat long held by the late Sen. Edward M. Kennedy.
 
A reporter asked Gibbs: “Have you heard the president express surprise or frustration?” with regards to the Massachusetts race.
 
“Yes. He’s both surprised and frustrated,” said Gibbs.
 
The reporter followed: “Anything else? Angry?”
 
“He’s not pleased,” said Gibbs.
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'We are at war, we are at war against al Qaeda,' President Barack Obama told the American people in remarks at the White House on Thursday, Jan. 7, 2010. (AP Photo)

Later in the briefing Gibbs was asked to specify at whom the president was angry. He declined to elaborate.
 
On several occasions, Gibbs said he would wait until after the returns came in from Massachusetts to answer further questions on the election. Some of the reporters phrased their questions as if Brown had already won the race.
 
Gibbs did say that the electorate is expressing a sense of anger that has been continuous since before the 2008 election that brought President Barack Obama into the White House. “There is a tremendous amount of upset and anger,” said Gibbs. “In many ways, we are here because of that upset and anger.”