Palin’s Support for Marriage Amendment Contradicts McCain’s Stance

October 21, 2008 - 12:55 PM
In an interview that aired on the Christian Broadcasting Network's "700 Club" on Tuesday, Republican vice presidential candidate Sarah Palin voiced her support for a constitutional amendment defining marriage as a union between a man and a woman – a view that differs from her running mate's stance.

Accompanied by her husband, Todd, right, Republican vice presidential candidate, Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin signs autographs after addressing a crowd at a minor league baseball field in Colorado Springs, Colo., Oct. 20, 2008. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)

(CNSNews.com) – In an interview with the Christian Broadcasting Network, Republican vice presidential candidate Sarah Palin voiced her support for a constitutional amendment defining marriage as a union between a man and a woman – a view that differs from her running mate’s stance.
 
GOP presidential candidate John McCain, who considers himself a “federalist,” said states should decide what marriage is.
 
“I have voted along with the vast majority of Alaskans who had the opportunity to vote to amend our Constitution defining marriage as between one man and one woman,” Palin told CBN’s David Brody. “I wish on a federal level that that’s where we would go because I don’t support gay marriage.
 
“I’m not going to be out there judging individuals … but I certainly can express my own opinion here and take actions that I believe would be best for traditional marriage, and that’s casting my votes and speaking up for traditional marriage … The foundation of our society is that strong family, and it’s based on that traditional definition of marriage,” she said.
 
In 2004 during a debate on the federal marriage amendment, McCain voiced his opposition to the amendment on the Senate floor, saying, “The constitutional amendment we’re debating today strikes me as antithetical in every way to the core philosophy of Republicans.
 
“It usurps from the states a fundamental authority they have always possessed and imposes a federal remedy for a problem that most states do not believe confronts them,” he added.