Pelosi Won’t Say When Jesus Got the Right to Life

August 3, 2010 - 12:22 PM
House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.), a Catholic, publicly stated earlier this year that she had a duty to pursue policies "in keeping with the values" of Jesus Christ, the "Word made Flesh." But at a press briefing last week, when reminded of this statement, Pelosi declined to say when Jesus got the right to life.
Nancy Pelosi

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.). (AP Photo/Cliff Owen)

(CNSNews.com) – House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.), a Catholic, publicly stated earlier this year that she had a duty to pursue policies “in keeping with the values” of Jesus Christ, the “Word made Flesh.” But at a press briefing last week, when reminded of this statement, Pelosi declined to say when Jesus got the right to life.
 
“Whenever it was,” said Pelosi, “we bow our heads when we talk about it in church, and that’s where I’d like to talk about that.”

Later, when asked in writing through her press secretary whether the speaker believed Jesus had a right to life from the moment of conception, the press secretary responded: “The speaker answered the question. Thanks.”
 
Pelosi, who favors legalized abortion, voted against the ban on partial-birth abortion that was enacted in 2003. 
 
On May 6 of this year, at a Catholic Community Conference on Capitol Hill, Pelosi said: “They ask me all the time, ‘What is your favorite this? What is your favorite that? What is your favorite that?’ And one time, ‘What is your favorite word?’ And I said, ‘My favorite word? That is really easy. My favorite word is the Word, is the Word. And that is everything. It says it all for us. And you know the biblical reference, you know the Gospel reference of the Word.”
 
“And that Word," Pelosi said, "is, we have to give voice to what that means in terms of public policy that would be in keeping with the values of the Word. The Word. Isn’t it a beautiful word when you think of it? It just covers everything. The Word.”
 

 
“Fill it in with anything you want,” she said. “But, of course, we know it means: ‘The Word was made flesh and dwelt amongst us.’ And that’s the great mystery of our faith. He will come again. He will come again. So, we have to make sure we’re prepared to answer in this life, or otherwise, as to how we have measured up.”

In the New Testament, John 1:14 states, “And the Word was made flesh, and dwelt among us, (and we saw His glory, the glory as it were of the only begotten of the Father) full of grace and truth.”
 
The Apostle’s Creed says: “He was conceived by the power of the Holy Spirit and born of the Virgin Mary.”

At her July 29 press briefing, CNSNews.com asked Speaker Pelosi: “You said at a recent Catholic Community Conference that your favorite word was ‘The Word, as in the word made flesh,’ and that we need to quote, ‘give voice to what that means in terms of public policy that would be in keeping with the Word.’ So, when was the Word made flesh? Was it at the Annunciation, when Jesus was conceived by the power of the Holy Sprit, as the Creed says, or was it at the Nativity when he was born of the Virgin Mary? And when did the Word get the right to life?”
 
Speaker Pelosi responded: “Whenever it was, we bow our heads when we talk about it in church, and that’s where I’d like to talk about that.”
 
(For the audio clip, click here.) 
 
CNSNews.com then sent an e-mail to the speaker’s press secretary, Nadeam Elshami, seeking to clarify the speaker’s answer. The e-mail said:
 
“Speaker Pelosi said at a Catholic Community Conference that her favorite word was ‘the Word’ as in ‘the Word made flesh’ and that we ‘need to [give] voice to what that means in terms of public policy.’ We’d like to clarify the speaker’s position on this: Did Jesus have the right to life from the moment of conception?”
 
In an e-mailed response, the press secretary wrote:  “The speaker answered the question. Thanks.”
 
The Catechism of the Catholic Church discusses Christ’s divinity from His conception. It states, “Christ's humanity has no other subject than the divine person of the Son of God, who assumed it and made it his own, from his conception.” (466
 
The Catechism also states,  “From its conception, the child has the right to life.” (2322