Conservatives on Gay Activists' 'Intimidation Strategy': ‘We Must Stand Up to the Bullies’

April 9, 2014 - 11:06 AM

Mozilla CEO

This undated photo provided by Mozilla shows co-founder and CEO Brendan Eich. Eich is stepping down as CEO and leaving the company following protests over his support of a gay marriage ban in California. (AP Photo/Mozilla)

(CNSNews.com) – The recent resignation of Mozilla CEO Brendan Eich because of his support for traditional marriage is symptomatic of the strategy of “intimidation” homosexual rights advocates have used to advance their agenda, conservative leaders said.

“The sexual liberationist movement has prosecuted its campaign for redefining marriage by labeling opponents ‘haters’ and ‘bigots,’” Robert P. George, professor of jurisprudence at Princeton University, told CNSNews.com. “This was a strategy of intimidation aimed at demonizing and marginalizing anyone who dared to oppose their agenda.

“It enabled them to win some important victories,” George said. “When intimidation works, you can expect the frequency of its use to increase.

Eich, co-founder of Mozilla, which makes the popular Firefox web browser, was appointed CEO on March 25, but resigned late last week after a backlash from critics unhappy with a $1,000 donation he made in 2008 to California’s Proposition 8, a ballot initiative in support of traditional marriage. The protests were largely spearheaded by an online dating website, OKCupid.

“What happened at Mozilla is an entirely predictable result of the political successes of the intimidation strategy,” George said, adding that people have to “stand up to the bullies.”

“Bullies only prevail when those whom they would victimize fail to stand up to them,” George said. “We must not permit ourselves to be silenced by a campaign of intimidation.

“Each of us needs to muster the courage to speak out even more loudly, and work even harder, in support of the values we cherish, beginning with the sanctity of human life and marriage as the covenant uniting husband and wife,” George said. “We must stand up to the bullies.”

Tony Perkins, president of the Family Research Council, agreed with George.

“Finally, the mask of ‘equality’ has slipped, and even its cheerleaders are realizing that the real face of the movement is ‘hateful, intolerant, illiberal, prosecutorial,” Perkins said in a statement issued following Eich’s resignation.

“Nowhere is that more evident than [gay rights advocate] GLAAD's response to Eich's ousting. ‘Mozilla's strong statement in favor of equality today reflects where corporate America is: inclusive, safe, and welcoming to all,’” Perkins said. “Or, more accurately, welcoming to all who agree with us.

“We all need to be clear: we are not merely contending with a different political or social point of view,” Perkins said. “The forces of political correctness intend to run over all freedom in America, freedom of religion, freedom of speech, of assembly, of press.

“They cannot achieve their goal without oppression,” Perkins said.

‘The new fascism’

On Sunday’s “This Week With George Stephanopoulos” on ABC, former speaker and presidential candidate Newt Gingrich called Eich’s departure “the new fascism.”

"This is just the most open, blatant example of the new fascism, which says if you don't agree with us 100 percent, we have the right to punish you, unless you're like Hillary [Clinton] and Barack Obama, and you recant,” Gingrich said referring to Obama and Clinton’s flip flop on the issue from being against same-sex marriage to promoting it.

‘The new blacklist’

Conservative commentator, author and former presidential candidate Pat Buchanan called homosexuals’ targeting of those who disagree with them “the new blacklist” in an April 8 column in “Townhall.”

"In the new dispensation, opposition to same-sex marriage disqualifies you from leadership and may legitimately be used to bring about the ruin of your career,” Buchanan said. “This is the new blacklist.

“The new blacklist means that while diversity of races, genders and sexual orientations is mandatory, diversity of thought and opinion is restricted,” Buchanan said. “In Silicon Valley, they burn heretics."

Hans von Spakovsky, senior legal fellow at the conservative Heritage Foundation, said Eich is not the only Prop 8 supporter to experience the wrath of the gay activists.

“Eich is certainly not alone in his predicament,” von Spakovsky is quoted as saying in the Heritage’s “The Foundry” blog. “As The Heritage Foundation previously pointed out, other supporters of Proposition 8 in California have been subjected to harassment, intimidation, vandalism, racial scapegoating, blacklisting, loss of employment, economic hardships, angry protests, violence, death threats, and anti-religious bigotry.”