Tax-Funded NPR Airs Story Featuring ‘Live Porn Shoot’

February 18, 2014 - 4:59 PM

computer porn

(AP Photo)

(CNSNews.com) – On its “All Things Considered” news program Monday, National Public Radio (NPR) aired a story that included a reporter attending a “live porn shoot.”

The “porn shoot” took place at the headquarters of Kink.com where the reporter interviewed “internet porn mogul” Peter Acworth.

 

The story, entitled “Hurting for Cash, Online Porn Tries New Tricks,” was produced by KQED public television and radio station in San Francisco, Calif.

The NPR story, posted on its All Tech Considered website pages, portrays the story as a business piece and Acworth as a victim.

"We're suffering what happened to the music industry a while back,” Acworth stated. “It's becoming much more easy to get content for free and people are less apt to want to pay for it.”

Acworth takes reporter Aarti Shahani upstairs at Kink headquarters to “the set of a live porn shoot.”

“A model who is performing in front of a webcam says in a sultry tone, ‘The part of my body that I like the most would probably have to be ...’ Her voice tapers off and she shows rather than tells,” the story said. “Paying subscribers are typing in what they'd like her to do next.”

The story begins with the reporter asking people on the street and the driver of the cab she rode in about their “favorite search terms for online pornography.”

"Teacher porn," Jason Ravel said. “That's who I was around most often in grade school.

“I was a really good student,” Ravel said.

Chanelle Dorton told the reporter her favorite is “ebony lesbian sex.”

"I don't like straight porn," she said.

Cab driver Neel Bell chimed in that he liked "heterosexual porn that doesn't involve porn stars.”

KQED’s mission statement on its website states:

“KQED is for everyone who wants to be more. Our television, radio, digital media and educational services change lives for the better and help individuals and communities achieve their full potential.”

KQED, which is affiliated with NPR and the Public Broadcasting Service (PBS), did not respond to an inquiry from CNSNews.com asking if reporting on pornography helped the media outlet meet its mission and whether or not they believe the reporting is beneficial to taxpayers, who help fund public broadcasting.

The Corporation for Public Broadcasting – the congressionally created funding arm for public radio and television – was appropriated $445,000,000 for fiscal year 2014, according to its financial records.