Q&A: How Hawaii health care compares to federal

July 29, 2014 - 12:05 PM

HONOLULU (AP) — Hawaii lawmakers and other key officials say the state's health care law faces an unlikely threat from the Affordable Care Act that could lead to a lower standard of care for state residents. Here's how Hawaii's longstanding law compares with federal reforms:

WHO MUST BE OFFERED HEALTH INSURANCE BY THEIR EMPLOYERS?

— Hawaii: All employees, with some exceptions including public employees, seasonal workers and family members

— Federal: No one. Employers are not required to offer health insurance to employees, but larger employers may eventually pay fees if they don't comply.

HOW MANY HOURS DOES AN EMPLOYEE HAVE TO WORK?

— Hawaii: 20 hours per week.

— Federal: 30 hours per week.

HOW LARGE DOES AN EMPLOYER HAVE TO BE TO TRIGGER REQUIREMENTS?

— Hawaii: An employer with only one employee has to offer health insurance.

— Federal: Employers with more than 100 full-time workers will be subject to the law in 2015, and employers with 50 full-time workers would be impacted in 2016.

HOW MUCH DO EMPLOYEES PAY TOWARD PREMIUMS?

— Hawaii: The employee's share of the premium cannot be more than 1.5 percent of wages.

— Federal: Employee's share of the premium cannot be more than 9.5 percent of the employee's annual household income.

WHAT HAPPENS IF AN EMPLOYER DOESN'T COMPLY?

— Hawaii: Employers can be shut down if the problem persists more than 30 days. They also will be fined $25 per day, or $1 per employee per day, whichever is greater.

— Federal: Employers who don't comply pay a fine of $2,000 per employee.