Saudi Muslim Clerics Debate Sex With Virgins in Paradise and Sexual Motivations of Terrorists

July 22, 2010 - 10:10 AM
Prominent Muslim clerics in Saudi Arabia recently debated whether sex with virgins is possible in the Muslim afterlife and whether that  should motivate jihadist terrorism.
al Qaida North Africa

A child walks past a wall bearing graffiti about the al-Qaeda network in a Muslim area of northern Nigerian city of Kano in 2003. (AP Photo/Schalk van Zuydam, File)

(CNSNews.com) – Prominent Islamic clerics in Saudi Arabia recently debated whether sex with virgins is possible in the Muslim afterlife, and whether that should motivate jihadists -- terrorists -- to have sex with virgins, according to a Middle East Media Research Institute (MEMRI) report
 
In June of this year, Dr. Anwar Bin Majid 'Ishqi, head of the Saudi Middle East Center for Strategic and Legal Studies, wrote an article titled "Paradise is Above Sex: The Dark Eyed Virgins are Not for Sensual Pleasure" in the Saudi publication Al-Risala.
 
“Two things induce me to write about sex in paradise,” 'Ishqi wrote. “First, the fact that the terrorists exploit adolescents, telling them that if they carry out suicide operations and kill and destroy, they will become martyrs, and as soon as they die, the dark-eyed virgins will welcome them in Paradise.  Second, I have discovered that a number of religious scholars and prominent intellectuals believe that sex is practiced in Paradise.”
 
According to Dr. 'Ishqi, sex does not take place in Paradise because those who dwell there do not have any sexual organs.
 
“(T)here is no sex in Paradise.  The sex organs of the people [who go there] disappear, because they have no need for them,” he wrote.
 
'Ishqi also wrote that Adam and Eve, who are recognized as the first humans and as Muslims in Islam, were not kicked out of Paradise by God because of their disobedience, but because they grew “shameful parts” after eating the forbidden fruit.
 
In contradiction to 'Ishqi’s claims, several Saudi clerics wrote dissenting articles arguing that there is indeed sex with virgins in Paradise.
 
Saudi cleric Khaled Muhammad Al-Nu'man wrote, “when we consider [Allah's] words – 'Surely the dwellers of the Garden shall on that day be [engaged] in a joyful occupation. Together with their spouses, they shall recline in shady groves upon soft couches' [Koran 33:55-56] – and what the exegetes say about them, we discover the opposite of what is claimed by the learned Dr. ['Ishqi].”
 
He added, “According to a large number of Koranic exegetes, the occupation... [referred to] in these verses is the deflowering of virgins.”
 
In a separate article, Saudi cleric Muhammad Kamel Al-Khoja wrote: “As for the enjoyment of sex in the Paradise, which is promised to the believers, Paradise is not above it.  What is concealed, and known only to the Creator, is 'how' [sex is experienced in Paradise].  However, I and all those who believe in the powers of Allah maintain that the pleasure of sex in Paradise will be higher, sweeter, and more joyous than the pleasure [of sex] in this world.”
 
Another cleric, Khaled Babtin, a member of the Saudi Association of Islamic Jurisprudence, cited scholars of the Prophet Muhammad who have written that the Prophet Muhammad himself assured Muslims that there would be sex with virgins in Paradise.
 
“On the authority of Abu Hurayra: 'The Prophet was asked, 'Shall we have sexual intercourse in Paradise?'  And he answered, 'Yes.  A man will have intercourse with one hundred virgins a day,” wrote Babtin.
 
All of the Saudi clerics agreed that terrorist organizations exploit the Muslim teaching about sex with virgins in Paradise to seduce young people into performing terrorist acts.
 
"We see then that Dr. 'Ishqi was affected by the words of the terrorist leaders and those who organize those sinful, criminal operations from which our country has suffered in the past – [the words] with which they seduce the youth.  Indeed, what these terrorists do is wrong and unacceptable, from the perspective of both Islamic law and common sense.  It is [their] way of stirring up the emotions and impulses of young and unsophisticated boys,” cleric Khaled Babtin wrote.