Sen. John Kerry Invokes ‘Dangerous Atmosphere’ of Sarah Palin’s Campaign Rallies

January 19, 2010 - 11:09 AM
"I'm no stranger to hard fought campaigns, but what we've seen in the past few days is way over the line and reminiscent of the dangerous atmosphere of Sarah Palin's 2008 campaign rallies," Kerry said in Boston on Monday.
Martha Coakley

Massachusetts Attorney General Martha Coakley and her husband Thomas F. O'Connor, Jr., wave to supporters outside the polling station in Medford where they cast their votes in the special election to replace former Sen. Edward Kennedy, D-Mass., on Tuesday, Jan. 19, 2010. (AP Photo/Bizuayehu Tesfaye)

(CNSNews.com) – What does Sarah Palin have to do with Tuesday’s U.S. Senate election in Massachusetts? Although she has endorsed Republican Scott Brown, she has not campaigned for him or with him.
 
But Sen. John Kerry (D-Mass.) brought Palin into the race on Monday, at a news conference where he urged Massachusetts voters to support Democrat Martha Coakley.
 
Kerry urged Brown to stop the “bullying and threats” by his out-of-state supporters.
 
“I'm no stranger to hard fought campaigns, but what we’ve seen in the past few days is way over the line and reminiscent of the dangerous atmosphere of Sarah Palin's 2008 campaign rallies,” Kerry said in Boston.
 
“This is not how democracy works in Massachusetts. Scott Brown needs to speak up and get his out-of-state tea party supporters under control. In Massachusetts, we fight hard and win elections on the issues and on our differences, not with bullying and threats,” Kerry said.
 
‘Anger out there’
 
At a Coakley campaign rally on Jan. 15, Kerry admitted “there is anger out there,” both in Massachusetts and across the nation.
 
“It’s justified anger,” Kerry said. “It’s understandable anger. People have lost their jobs. Many people have had their life savings wiped away. People have seen homes taken out fro under them in countless numbers across our nation. And there’s a fear and an anxiety out there. Let me tell you, let’s not forget where that anger ought to be directed.”

According to Kerry, the anger should be directed at Republicans – “at the people and the principles and the policies and the party that threw out the regulators; that opened the floodgates of greed, that invited in the worst economic times in this country’s history – and I believe turned its back on fairness and common sense in this country.”
 
At the Jan. 15 rally, Kerry branded Republicans as the party of ‘no’ – blasting them for offering no alternatives. “The only thing Republicans say ‘yes’ to is Rush Limbaugh, Glenn Beck, tea partiers,” he said to the applause of Coakley supporters.
 
(Although Republicans have offered alternatives – to health care reform, for instance – they don’t have the votes to advance their proposals.)
 
Kerry also branded Scott Brown as “George Bush’s yes-man,” saying Brown wants to go to Washington “to become Mitch McConnell’s no-man. And we’re not going to let him do it,” Kerry said.
 
On Tuesday -- election day in Massachusetts -- polls showed Brown leading Coakley by as much as nine points.

Even Sen. Kerry noted the importance of Tuesday's election: “The voting here is going to determine the balance of power in America,"  he said last week. "And with it, it is going to determine the fate of what we started with Barack Obama a little over a year ago.”