Senator-Elect Scott Brown to Be Sworn In on Thursday, Ahead of ‘Important Votes’

February 3, 2010 - 7:19 PM
U.S. Senator-elect Scott Brown (R), in a hand-delivered letter to the governor of Masasachusetts on Wednesday, requested that his election to office be certified immediately so he can be sworn into office on Thursday afternoon in the nation's capital.
(CNSNews.com) – U.S. Senator-elect Scott Brown, in a hand-delivered letter to the governor of Massachusetts on Wednesday, requested that his election to office be certified immediately so he can be sworn into office on Thursday afternoon in the nation’s capital.
 
Written by Brown’s campaign’s legal counsel, Daniel Winslow, the letter changes Brown’s earlier plans.
 
“While Senator-elect Brown had tentatively planned to be sworn into office on February 11, he has been advised that there are a number of votes scheduled prior to that date,” the letter states. “For that reason, he wants certification to occur immediately. As he is the duly elected United States senator from the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, he is entitled to be seated now."
 
“Accordingly, on behalf of Senator-elect Brown, we request that the results of the special election of Jan.19, 2010 be certified without delay and that a duplicate original copy be provided to be in hand no later than 11:00 a.m. on Thursday, Feb. 4, 2010 so we may deliver the original by hand to the Secretary of the United States Senate in time to allow Senator-elect Brown to be administered the oath of office by the Vice President tomorrow afternoon,” the letter states.

Brown himself says he expects to be sworn in on Thursday, Feb. 4, at 5 p.m. by Vice President Joe Biden, acting in his capacity as Senate president.
 
Why the hurry? Brown says he wants to start serving the people of Massachusetts.

Until Brown is seated as the senator from Massachusetts, acting Sen. Paul Kirk -- a Democrat -- could help push through legislation or nominations that Brown possibly would vote against, such as President Barack Obama’s nomination of Craig Becker to the National Labor Relations Board.The Associated Press reported that while Brown may be replacing Kennedy in the Senate, he will not get to use the mahogany desk on the Senate floor that Kennedy used for nearly 47 years.

The senior senator from Massachusetts, John F. Kerry, is taking Kennedy's desk.

Until now, the AP reported, Kerry has been seated at the desk once used by Sen. Robert F. Kennedy, Ted Kennedy's brother. Ted's desk was once used by his other brother -- John F. Kennedy, who served in the Senate before becoming president.