Hoyer: 'I Don't Think Obamacare Has Failed'

November 25, 2013 - 7:00 AM

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House Minority Whip Steny Hoyer (D-Md.) (AP File Photo)

(CNSNews.com) - Rep. Steny Hoyer (D-Md.), the number two Democrat in the House of Representatives, says he and other Democrats who supported Obamacare are "all very disappointed" in the rollout process, but he indicated that repealing the law is not an option:

"I don't think Obamacare has failed," Hoyer told CBS's "Face the Nation with Bob Schieffer."

"Access to Obamacare has been a failure at this point in time, and it needs to be fixed. So from that standpoint, the substance of Obamacare is yet to be tested. And to the extent it has been tested, it's been a success for millions of people." He was referring to young people who can stay on their parents' policies until age 26 and people with pre-existing conditions who can no longer be denied coverage.

"The process has been terrible, and we're all very disappointed, those of us who support the Affordable Care Act," Hoyer said. "But the Affordable Care Act, Bob -- the majority of the American public says, look, we need to fix it, not repeal it."

Hoyer said it's necessary to improve access to the online exchanges: "We don't need to start over. And Bob, I don't think the American people want to start over. They want a system that works. We all do. And the Republicans have offered no alternative at this point in time, simply repeal."

That is not true. Several Republican bills have been introduced in the House to repeal Obamacare and replace it with a health insurance system that would let Americans purchase health insurance across state lines and allow small businesses to pool together to boost their buying power.

As CNSNews.com reported, legislation introduced by Republicans also advocate changes to malpractice laws and would expand access to Health Savings Accounts. Funding would be set aside for high-risk pools to help people with pre-existing conditions afford insurance.

Also see:
Republican Alternative to Obamacare Gaining Momentum, Bill's Sponsor Says