Sheriff Arpaio: Border Patrol 'Too Busy Changing Diapers' to Go After 'Dope Peddlers'

June 17, 2014 - 5:42 AM

illegal

Foreigners cross the Rio Grande illegally to enter the U.S.A. (AP File Photo) U.S.A. (

(CNSNews.com) - The massive influx of children from Central America is keeping the U.S. Border Patrol very busy, but not in the right way, says Maricopa County (Ariz.) Sheriff Joe Arpaio.

Border Patrol agents "are too busy changing diapers and not going after dope peddlers and illegal immigrants," Arpaio told Fox News's Sean Hannity Monday night.

"And I think the president knew this was going to happen."

Arpaio said the crisis will make it easier for Obama to issue executive orders if Congress refuses to take up immigration reform legislation. "But it might backfire," Arpaio added. "It might backfire, because of the inhumane situation."

Arpaio believes President Obama "opened up a can of worms" by unilaterally waiving deportation for certain young people.

"And we'll see how it settles," he said. "This is a great country. You're trying to tell me we can't keep people from coming into our country if we really had the desire to do it? I don't buy it. There's something wrong."

Earlier, Arizona Attorney General Tom Horne told Fox News's Neil Cavuto that "hundreds" of illegal aliens caught crossing into Texas from Mexico have been sent to Arizona. "They just dumped the people," he said.

"[T]hey could have flown them to Guatemala or Mexico or whatever. They flew them to Arizona, and then they bussed them to the Greyhound bus station, and then they just dumped them there with a piece of paper saying, please show up in 15 days for processing, which presumably they won't be willing to do.

"They have been transported into the interior of the country, and they can just disappear into the woodwork."

Horne noted that human smugglers used to be the ones who brought people from the U.S.-Mexico border to the interior: "Now we have the federal government doing it."

Horne said he's sent the Border Patrol a "cease and desist" order to stop the illegal alien dumping in Arizona.

"I haven't heard back yet. But I cited two federal statutes. One federal statute says that they're supposed to defend and guard the border, which means they could detain people. They could send them back...The federal government is supposed to be sending them back to Mexico or Central America. Somebody in the federal government has a bizarre sense of humor and said, let's send them to the state of Arizona instead.

Horne said he's sued the Obama administration as much as anybody in the country.

"And so there may be some bad feelings there. But whatever their motive, what they're doing is wrong. And I am demanding that they cease and desist. And we're aggressively researching what legal avenues are available to us in federal court if they continue to do this..."

Horne said hundreds of unaccompanied minors have been sent to a warehouse in Nogales. "And however you feel about immigration, when you have kids in your custody, you have to treat them humanely."

Vice President Joe Biden is stopping in Guatemala Friday -- on his way to the World Cup in Brazil -- to express U.S. concern about thousands of unaccompanied children crossing into the United States.

A White House spokesman said Biden will warn Central American leaders about the danger and futility of sending children to the  U.S.

"[I]f there are steps that these countries can take to ensure the safety of their children and to dissuade parents from entrusting them in the hands of strangers to try to deliver them to the United States, we'd like to shut that off as quickly as we can," Josh Earnest told reporters on Monday.

"And some of that is making sure that those parents understand exactly what the law is, and the law says, that these unaccompanied minors when they show up at the border would not qualify for deferred action, like the administration announced a couple years ago."

Earnest refused to say if President Obama's policy of allowing certain children to avoid deportation has encouraged so many more of them to cross the border.

"Well, again, I don't think I want to put myself in a position of being able to understand exactly what's happening, but to the extent that we can clarify what the law is, we're going to do that. And that will be part of the vice president's mission."

The Associated Press reported that U.S. officials may temporarily house hundreds of Central American children and teenagers on the campus of a closed college in the small tobacco-farming community of Lawrenceville, Virginia.

The report quoted Brunswick County Sheriff Brian Roberts as saying that residents are worried about security and are upset no one told them about the plan.