Americans Are Fatter Than in 2008; Poor People More Likely to be Fat than Middle Class or Wealthy

May 3, 2010 - 11:58 AM
A very slightly higher percentage of Americans are obese today than were a year ago, when President Barack Obama took office, but obesity has gotten "decidedly" worse since 2008, according to a new survey by Gallup.
(CNSNews.com) - A very slightly higher percentage of Americans are obese today than were a year ago, when President Barack Obama took office, but obesity has gotten “decidedly” worse since 2008, according to a new survey by Gallup.
 
“Americans so far in 2010 have yet to reverse the increase in obesity found in 2009,” said Gallup’s analysis of the survey.  “At the same time, fewer Americans are maintaining a ‘normal’ weight by Body Mass Index (BMI) standards.”
 
“The most recent quarterly rates of obesity and normal weight among the U.S. adult population essentially match those found throughout 2009, but they are decidedly worse than 2008 levels,” said Gallup’s analysis.
 
Poorer Americans are more likely to be obese than those in the middle class or with higher incomes, the survey showed.
 
In the first quarter of 2009, the obesity rate for American adults was 26.2%, said Gallup. In the first quarter of this year, it was 26.7%.  For all of 2008, the obesity rate was 25.5 percent compared to 26.5 percent for all of 2009.
 
Americans earning $90,000 per year or more are the least likely to be fat, with an obesity rate of 21.7 percent in the first quarter of 2010.
 
Americans earning in the next highest income bracket in the Gallup survey—$36,000 to $89,999 per year—were the second least likely to be fat, with an obesity rate of 27.1 percent in the first quarter of 2010.
 
Americans earning between $6,000 and $35,999 are the most likely to be fat, with an obesity rate of 31.7 percent in the first quarter of 2010.
 
Americans earning less than $6,000 were the second-most likely to be fat, with an obesity rate of 31.2 percent in the first quarter of 2010. 
 
Gallup's survey was based on interviews with more than 670,000 adults since 2008.