Democrat Congressman Assures Europeans Trump Won’t Return to Power; Republicans ‘Don’t Want’ Him

By Patrick Goodenough | June 28, 2022 | 4:20am EDT
Tennessee Democratic Rep. Steve Cohen. (Photo by Greg Nash / Pool / AFP via Getty Images)
Tennessee Democratic Rep. Steve Cohen. (Photo by Greg Nash / Pool / AFP via Getty Images)

(CNSNews.com) – President Trump will not return to the White House, a liberal Democratic lawmaker told a European audience on Monday, assuring them that “mature” Republicans will ensure the party nominates a “cogent, sane, and healthy presidential candidate.”

“The Republicans don’t want President Trump,” Rep. Steve Cohen (D-Tenn.) declared.

Cohen was taking part in the German Marshall Fund’s annual Brussels Forum, where discussion turned to the question of whether Americans would continue to support Ukraine, given domestic priorities and other pressures.

He said that under President Biden, U.S. support would continue.

The panel moderator, Foreign Policy editor in chief Ravi Agrawal, then asked the congressman, “What do you tell people when you come to Europe who say, ‘What’s going to happen when President Trump is back in power?’ What’s your response?”

“President Trump will not be back in power,” Cohen replied. “The Republicans don’t want President Trump.”

He continued, “There’s the hard – there’s the MAGA folk, the hardcore MAGA folk, and there’s the hardcore Q-Anon folk. But that’s not the Republican Party. And I think that the – that mature parents in the room of the Republican Party will surface and see to it that they have a cogent, sane, and healthy presidential candidate.”

“Let’s hope so,” said Agrawal, prompting laughter from the audience.

 

On a day when G7 leaders meeting in Germany pledged to continue providing support for Ukraine “for as long as it takes,” panelists at the Brussels Forum discussed a Marshall Plan-type program to help rebuild war-ravaged Ukraine once the war launched by Russia is over.

Cohen – who is co-chair of the Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe, also known as the U.S. Helsinki Commission – said he believed that the U.S. under Biden would remain supportive of Ukraine.

“Joe Biden is not President Trump, thank God,” he said. “And Joe Biden understands our connection to Europe and to our Western allies and he’s made a commitment and he will stick to it. He realizes the importance of this.”

President Trump meets with French President Emmanuel Macron on the sidelines of a NATO summit London in 2019. (Photo by Ludovic Marin / Pool / AFP via Getty Images)
President Trump meets with French President Emmanuel Macron on the sidelines of a NATO summit London in 2019. (Photo by Ludovic Marin / Pool / AFP via Getty Images)

Cohen said many congressional Republicans were in favor of supporting Ukraine financially, but others do not, “because they want to put the money into America first.” (The latter group he largely associated with the viewpoint of dismissing the significance of the January 6, 2021 breach of the U.S. Capitol – or in his words, “the coup d’etat that we almost experienced.”)

Should the Republicans win control of Congress in the midterms, he said, some of those people may gain more influence and be more outspoken.

But Biden, Cohen added, would “stay strong.”

In a survey conducted by the GOP-affiliated McLaughlin & Associates, released on Friday, 70 percent of Republican primary voters polled said they want to see Trump run for the White House again in 2024.

And if Trump did run, 84 percent of GOP primary voters said they would support him for the nomination.

Up against more than a dozen potential Republican candidates, Trump came in second, with 17 points, behind Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis, with 32. Former Vice President Mike Pence came in third, with 12 points.

In a Trump-Biden matchup, respondents handed victory to Trump by 49 points to 44. In a hypothetical contest against Vice President Kamala Harris, Trump won by 50-42.

In a Morning Consult/Politico survey earlier this month, 53 percent of registered Republican respondents said they would support Trump in a 2024 presidential primary, followed by 16 percent for DeSantis, and 13 percent for Pence.

A straw poll at a conservative conference in Colorado in early June put DeSantis in the lead as GOP presidential nominee at 71 percent, ahead of Trump at 67 percent. Attendees at the Western Conservative Summit could vote for more than one candidate.

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