Uyghurs Condemn Harvard for Hosting Chinese Communist Party Cheerleader

Michael W. Chapman | April 21, 2022 | 3:06pm EDT
Text Audio
00:00 00:00
Font Size
Chinese Communist Party official Huang Ping, the counsel general of China in New York, speaks at Harvard Business School, April 16, 2022.  (Screenshot, China's Ministry of Foreign Affairs)
Chinese Communist Party official Huang Ping, the counsel general of China in New York, speaks at Harvard Business School, April 16, 2022. (Screenshot, China's Ministry of Foreign Affairs)

(CNS News) -- Harvard University hosted Chinese Communist Party (CCP) official Huang Ping, the counsel general of China's New York Consulate, to present a speech on April 16, a step that a leader of the Uyghurs -- over a million of whom are being held in Chinese concentration camps -- condemned. 

"We condemn Harvard for hosting Huang Ping, who openly supports the Chinese government’s ongoing campaign of genocide against Uyghurs and other Turkic peoples in East Turkistan," said Prime Minister Salih Hudayar of the East Turkistan Government in Exile in a statement.

Salih Hudayar, Prime Minister of the East Turkistan Government-in-Exile. (Screenshot)
Salih Hudayar, Prime Minister of the East Turkistan Government-in-Exile. (Screenshot)

"We demand Harvard issue an immediate apology and condemn the Uyghur genocide," he added.

As numerous media and human rights groups have documented, an estimated 1-2 million Uyghur Muslims, along with other religious minorities, are imprisoned in Communist detention camps primarily in northwest China. 

One of the reported Uyghur detention camps in China.  (Getty Images)
One of the reported Uyghur detention camps in China. (Getty Images)

Chinese officials are trying to force the Uyghurs to weave socialist/Marxist policies into their religious beliefs. China is doing the same with Protestants, evangelicals, Catholics, and Falun Gong followers. People in the detention camps are subject to torture, rape, execution, and the harvesting of their body organs while they're still alive, according to numerous reports

The U.S. State Department has declared that China's actions constitute "genocide and crimes against humanity." China's genocide of the Uyghurs has also been condemned by Canada's House of Commons, the Dutch parliament, Britain's House of Commons, and the French National Assembly

Huang Ping, however, denies any genocide. 

"As I said, there’s no genocide, not a single evidence to prove that there’s a genocide or something there," he said in a 2021 interview. "It’s just a slandering."

Huang Ping spoke at the 25th  annual Harvard College China Forum at the Harvard Business School. 

(Getty Images)
(Getty Images)

In his speech, Huang praised the Communist Party and regime's history of socialism.

"Last year, China celebrated the centennial of the founding of the Communist Party of China, and we are now embarking on a new journey to build a great modern socialist country," he said. 

Huang continued, "Last year marked the 100th anniversary of the founding of the Communist Party of China. Over the past 100 years, the CPC has united and led the Chinese people to achieve world-renowned achievements in developing our country and improving people’s lives. Last year, we achieved the goal of building a moderately prosperous society in all respects as scheduled, and solved the problem of absolute poverty historically."

"Now we are embarking on a new journey toward building a modern socialist country," said Huang.  "China will unswervingly be a builder of world peace, a contributor to global development, and a defender of the international order, and will continue to make unremitting efforts for human development and progress."

(Getty Images)
(Getty Images)

In addition to the genocide of the Uyghurs, Communist Chinese officials persecute Christians and other religious groups and regularly destroy churches. Catholic bishops and priests are frequently arrested and detained.

Since the Communists took over in 1949-50 under dictator Mao Zedong, the totalitarian regime has killed more than 65 million of its own people, according to The Black Book of Communism (Harvard University Press). 

That's far more than the Nazis killed during their 12-year reign, and it is more than the estimated number of people who were killed globally during WWII. (That number is between 40 million and 50 million, according to the Encyclopedia Britannica.)  

In the 1989 crackdown on Tiananmen Square pro-democracy demonstrators, an estimated 10,000 people were killed, reported the BBC

Chinese President Xi Jinping.  (Getty Images)
Chinese President Xi Jinping. (Getty Images)

According to Human Rights Watch, some of the human rights abuses Chinese officials regularly engage in include "mass arbitrary detention, torture, enforced disappearances, mass surveillance, cultural and religious persecution, separation of families, forced returns to China, forced labor, and sexual violence and violations of reproductive rights."

There appears to be little moral difference between what the Communist Chinese do to their alleged enemies and what the Nazis did. 

donate
mrc merch