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Trump’s Acting Director of National Intelligence: ‘Being Gay Makes Me a Better Christian’

By CNSNews.com Staff | March 5, 2020 | 12:05pm EST
Richard Grenell (Screen Capture)
Richard Grenell (Screen Capture)

(CNSNews.com) - Richard Grenell, the U.S. ambassador to Germany whom President Donald Trump has now named the acting Director of National Intelligence, said in an interview on “The Rubin Report” that being gay makes him a better Christian.

You know, I think being gay makes me a better Christian--to be honest,” Grenell said in the interview.

When Grenell was sworn by Vice President Mike Pence, his partner Matt Lashey held the Bible.

As acting Director of National Intelligence, Grenell oversees the entire U.S. intelligence community, including the Central Intelligence Agency and the National Security Agency.

In this interview on “The Rubin Report,” Grenell told host David Rubin that he was “born gay” and “was made this way in the image of God.”

“I was made this way, right, and the Bible says everyone is fearfully and wonderfully made,” said Grenell.

“I was made this way. I was born gay,” he said. “So, the fact of the matter is I fully embrace that I was made this way in the image of God and you can be gay and be a Christian. And there’s no problem with it.”

Grenell said in the interview that the “translation” of the Bible from the 1950s “somehow takes the word homosexuality and puts in into a different context.”

“You really have to go back to the original language, the original Greek, and really understand what the words were when the translation in the 1950s somehow takes the word homosexuality and puts it into a different context,” he said.

Here is a transcript from Grenell’s appearance on “The Rubin Report” where he explained how being gay made him a better Christian:

David Rubin: “Let’s back up for a second, because you mentioned your Evangelical upbringing and then you showed me your gay mustache shirt, Rick. I thought this is not possible. I thought Evangelicals can’t be gay or Christian theology and homosexuality are at odds. Or all of these things. But you strike me as a decent, functioning person, and we’ve had dinner with you and Matt and all that good stuff. So, make some sense out of this.

Richard Grenell: “You know, I think being gay makes me a better Christian--to be honest. I’ll tell you this, I have felt guilty—this is an admission—that when I had cancer and I was really kind of down in terms of my physical outlook, I felt like I prayed more and I was closer to God because I was in need.

“I feel guilty about that as I go through life and, of course, the ups and downs of life, when things are going well you don’t pray as much. You don’t really think about God, or the existence of the Creator. And I started to feel really guilty about that. And, so, I just think that every person needs to have—whether it’s a group of people or a philosophy of some sort--that keeps them in check, that kind of questions what life’s ups are about.

And, so, for me, being gay, I think I get so much challenge that you can’t be gay and be a Christian that it makes me a better Christian. It makes--I am an imperfect follower of Christ. I fail every single day. But for me what’s the beauty of this is that the Bible talks about having new mercies every morning and grace every morning.

“I get up every morning and I just think, thank God, that I believe in the Creator and that every morning I have a new beginning and a new chance to prove myself in this totally human state that fails every day. And, so, I was made this way, right, and the Bible says everyone is fearfully and wonderfully made. I was made this way. I was born gay. So, the fact of the matter is I fully embrace that I was made this way in the image of God and you can be gay and be a Christian. And there’s no problem with it.

“I think the world is also changing within the church, that the church really believes that. And when you look at the Biblical kind of mantra about this, you really have to go back to the original language, the original Greek, and really understand what the words were when the translation in the 1950s somehow takes the word homosexuality and puts it into a different context.

“I wonder if you know Peter Gomes. He passed away, but Peter was the minister at Harvard Memorial Church, and he was conservative, and black, and gay, and a minister.  And he was an incredible, just literally an incredible mentor to me, to think about how God made me and what the Bible says, about really a whole bunch of these 20th Century issues: the subjugation of women, immigration, all these. He wrote this book called The Good Book, and he takes all these issues and goes back to show how both sides of the argument over the years have used the Bible in their favor. They’ve said things like, you know: God has told me to have this position.

“And you manipulate it on both sides and he kind of showed, look, stop with the manipulators and look at what the original language says. I love things like that. It’s like an exogenesis [sic] of the words and the time.”





 

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