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Piers Morgan on Meghan Markle: 'I Was Going to Be Damned If I Was Going to Apologize'  

By Emma Riley | April 6, 2021 | 5:47pm EDT
Featured are pundit Piers Morgan and Duchess of Sussex Meghan Markle. (Photo credit: D Dipasupil/Getty Images for Extra and Meghan Markle and Max Mumby/Indigo/Getty Images)
Featured are pundit Piers Morgan and Duchess of Sussex Meghan Markle. (Photo credit: D Dipasupil/Getty Images for Extra and Meghan Markle and Max Mumby/Indigo/Getty Images)

"I was going to be damned if I was going to apologize for something that I believe," Daily Mail Editor-at-Large Piers Morgan told Fox News host Tucker Carlson after being forced to quit "Good Morning Britain" following his critique of Meghan Markle's interview with Oprah Winfrey.

Morgan noted that Markle had gotten in touch with his boss after the remarks.

"Frankly, I should be allowed in a democracy that values freedom of speech, I should be allowed to say 'I'm sorry, I don't believe you,'" the Daily Mail editor-at-large told Carlson. "But I wasn't. I wasn’t allowed to do that. It was Meghan's way and Meghan's narrative and Meghan's truth. That phrase was actually used by Oprah Winfrey. 'This is your truth.' What does that mean?"

Below is a transcript of this portion of “Tucker Carlson Tonight”:

Tucker Carlson: When Piers Morgan was forced off the air last month, we were told that he insulted the fake duchess from Los Angeles. But on some level, it wasn't really about her or even about him. It was about all of us and our right to say what we think is true in a supposedly free country. It was about free speech and the freedom of conscience. He of course is still editor-at-large at Daily Mail and what he writes is still worth reading. But he's not on television right now. And again, that has implications from the freedom of speech around the world. Here's part of our conversation. 

Piers Morgan: What I found is over five years, we trebled the ratings on "Good Morning Britain." The last day ironically was, as you said, the first day we beat the BBC ever. And we had trebled our ratings. So you would’ve thought people might be thanking me. Instead, I was basically corralled into a position where I was told either you got to apologize for effectively disbelieving Meghan Markle's version of events here or your position is untenable and you have to leave. And my gut was, I was going to be damned if I was going to apologize for something that I believe. And I just wasn't going to go down that road. I've seen too many people, when they're bullied by the woke brigade into apologizing. We saw it with Sharon Osbourne. She was bullied into apologizing for defending me against a disgusting slur that I'm a racist. And rather than the person who was accusing her apologizing to me -- Sheryl Underwood, for accusing me falsely of being a racist -- Sharon had to apologize for her passionate defense of me. And then she lost her job anyway.

We saw recently the editor of Teen Vogue. Before she could even start, she apologized for years about stuff she tweeted as a 17-year-old kid. But that wasn't enough. So apologies don't ever get you anywhere. I don't believe Meghan Markle. Now what I didn't know and what was a fascinating thing to discover after I left, was that Meghan Markle, between the Monday and Tuesday, had made a personal complaint to the boss of ITV, Dame Carolyn McCall. I didn't know that. I was never told that. I don't know what pressure she was directly putting on, but she did, I know, personally contact her. I also know she had personally contacted, along with Prince Harry, Ofcom, which is a government regulatory body designed to regulate what we put out on news shows. So I was under attack from Ms. Markle both directly to my boss and to the government regulatory body, under attack to basically conform to her version of events. And I had to believe her. And if I didn't, I was a callous racist and I should be condemned and ultimately, as it turned out later that day, lose my job. And I think that's a pretty perilous slope: a journalist's job, which is to express skepticism about some of the more outlandish claims like the secret wedding, like the story about Archie becoming a prince, and so on, even down to small stuff like she'd never had any interest in the royals when there are pictures of her draped over Buckingham Palace railings when she was a teenager and so on. I should be able to be a journalist and question the veracity of those statements.

And frankly, I should be allowed in a democracy that values freedom of speech, I should be allowed to say "I'm sorry, I don't believe you." But I wasn't. I wasn’t allowed to do that. It was Meghan's way and Meghan's narrative and Meghan's truth. That phrase was actually used by Oprah Winfrey. "This is your truth." What does that mean? When did we get to your truth? This is the kind of defense that -- it was the kind of thing we would hear liberals attack Donald Trump for, for reinventing tracts, for creating his own truth. But when Meghan Markle does it, the same liberals that attack Donald Trump cheer and applaud her, say "this is her truth. And it must be believed. And if you don't believe it, you're a racist." Well, I'm sorry; I'm not a racist. I just don’t believe her. 

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