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Mexican Sisters: ‘Renting Our Wombs Is The Family Business’ – Surrogates For Gay Couples in Europe

By Penny Starr | May 3, 2016 | 4:45pm EDT

Joe Travella, left, and his homosexual

partner, Brent, right, hold their surrogacy-

made children Sophia, 2, from left, and

one-year-old twins Paolo and

Julia, at their home in South Orange, N.J.

(AP) 

 

Four sisters living in the Tabasco state in Mexico shared their story about how acting as surrogates for gay European couples is earning them what is considered a fortune in their impoverished community, according to a recent report in the Daily Mail.

“The four sisters stand gossiping underneath the washing line, the growing baby bumps visible under tightly-fitting tops,” the April 27 story reported. “But the unemployed Hernandez sisters are not looking forward to the birth of much-wanted babies.”

“Instead, they are 'wombs-for-hire' -- willing to put their bodies through agony in order to earn thousands from desperate Europeans, prepared to pay more than these single mothers could earn in 20 years for their chance to have their own biological child,” the story said.

All four of the sisters are single mothers, some with multiple children with different fathers. They and their biological children live with their grandmother, who said she encouraged them to be surrogates -- an arrangement that can earn them $12,000 or more for a successful delivery.

“As a young single mother from a poor background in Villahermosa, your job options are either waitress or prostitute,” said the eldest sister, Milagros, who is 30, and has three children from three different fathers. “Surrogacy was an easy way to ensure a future for my own children.”

The sisters say they do get attached to the children they bear, even if they are not biologically related. Part of the arrangement is to breastfeed the babies for 10 days before they are handed over to the adopting parents.

Pregnant woman. (AP images.) 

 

The Daily Mail reports that the Tabasco state congress has tried to regulate the $100-million-dollar-industry by outlawing attorneys, agencies, or a third party to be involved in surrogacy arrangement, but it does not prohibit women from making their own arrangements.

“I'm sacrificing my own body to secure a future in a country where nothing comes easy,” said Milagros, who is in her third surrogate pregnancy. Her younger sisters, Martha, 30, Maria, 27 and Paulina, 22 are also pregnant with surrogate children.

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