Commentary

Monkeypox Vaccine is No Panacea -- Change Behavior

By Bill Donohue | August 5, 2022 | 11:11am EDT
Monkeypox.  (Getty Images)
Monkeypox. (Getty Images)

Imagine if those who drink too much alcohol and wind up damaging their liver were to band together demanding a cure for their malady, without first pledging to change their behavior. What would we say? What would we say to heavy smokers if they demanded a cure for lung cancer without first pledging to change their behavior?

Yet when it comes to homosexuals and monkeypox, or AIDS before that, gay leaders demand that we find a cure for their disease without first pledging to change their behavior.

When Covid hit, we locked down the economy, closed schools, and banned church services. So why didn't health officials cancel the "Pride" events in New York City at the end of June? A predictable surge in monkeypox followed.

Why didn't health officials ban the Dore Alley gay festival at the end of July in San Francisco? Those who attended this event said there were no warnings posted anywhere.

The Washington Post interviewed people at the Dore Alley event and noted that some were quite worried. "Many revelers kept their clothes on or donned full latex outfits inside crowded bars." In other words, had they not been afraid of catching monkeypox, they may have not have kept their pants on. This is not normal. What kind of people act this way?

Scott Wiener is a California state senator and a gay activist. He says the monkeypox vaccine "can't come fast enough." What about gays changing their behavior? "If people want to have sex, they are going to have sex."

He just doesn't get it. Vaccines are no panacea for behaviorally induced diseases.

The August 5 edition of the New York Times has an op-ed by Kai Kupferschmidt advising gays what to do before the vaccine is widely available. "That includes talking about reducing the number of sexual partners, creating 'pods' of sex partners (where people can keep sexual activity within a group) and other strategies to reduce the risk."

Why the compulsion on the part of so many homosexual men to have multiple sex partners with anonymous men? This is not normal. And why is it that the best Kupferschmidt can do is recommend that gays have sex with multiple partners whom they know?

One voice of sanity in the medical profession is Don Weiss, the top epidemiologist at the New York City Department of Health. His advice is seminal.

In an email he sent to other health officials, he said, "We cannot vaccinate our way out of this, nor can we isolate our way out of this. The only way out is to abstain. I know I sound like a Bible thumping preacher, but this is the exposure we need to PREVENT."

Weiss added that, "This disease is entirely preventable had we the courage to send out prevention messages. We seem paralyzed by the fear of stigmatizing this disease while we totally ignore the epidemiology. If we had an outbreak associated with bowling, would we not warn people to stop bowling."

We need to send Catholic moral theologians and doctors into the gay community to advise them of the merits of Catholic sexual ethics. Agreeing to temporarily keep one's pants on in public is not a strategy that works.

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