Census Bureau: ‘LGBT Adults…Reported Roughly Twice the Rate of Mental Health Challenges as Non-LGBT Adults’

By CNSNews.com Staff | June 22, 2022 | 1:21pm EDT
(Photo by Donato Fasano/Getty Images)
(Photo by Donato Fasano/Getty Images)

(CNSNews.com) - Lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) adults in the United States are about twice as likely as non-LGBT adults to suffer from “mental health challenges,” according to the U.S. Census Bureau.

“LGBT adults ages 18 and older reported roughly twice the rate of mental health challenges as non-LGBT adults,” the Census Bureau said in a release published on June 16.

These results come from the Census Bureau’s Household Pulse Survey, which started in April 2020 after the beginning of the COVID pandemic, and which last July started asking respondents about their sexual orientation.

Overall, in surveys conducted from March through May of this year, 50.0 percent of LGBT adults said they had symptoms of anxiety, while only 24.3 percent of non-LGBT adults said they had symptoms of anxiety.

(Census Bureau Chart)
(Census Bureau Chart)

Meanwhile, 41.6 percent of LGBT adults said they had symptoms of depression, while only 19.4 percent of non-LGBT adults said they had symptoms of depression.

LGBT people with children in their households were more likely than LGBT people who did not have children in their households to experience symptoms of anxiety or depression.

“Throughout the time series, LGBT adults living in households with children were more likely than adults (regardless of LGBT status) in other types of households to report anxiety symptoms.”

According to the suvey’s data from March through May of this year, 54.6 percent of LGBT adults with children in their households said they had symptoms of anxiety. That compared to 28.5 percent of non-LGBT adults with children in their households who said they had symptoms of anxiety.

(Census Bureau Chart)
(Census Bureau Chart)

At the same time, 46.8 percent of LGBT adults with children in their home said they had symptoms of depression, while only 21.0 percent of non-LGBT adults with children in their home said they had symptoms of depression.

“Survey respondents are categorized as LGBT if they report a sex at birth that does not align with their current gender identity; report a sexual orientation of gay, lesbian, or bisexual; or if they currently identify as transgender,” said the Census Bureau.

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